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Chmltech Online Journal, Volume 101, Issue 1

Advancements and Challenges in Solid-State Hydrogen Absorption: A Comprehensive Review

Quak Foo Lee

Chief Technology Officer

Chmltech Ltd.

Division of Clean Energy Technology Innovation


Abstract:

This review article provides a comprehensive examination of the principles, advancements, and challenges in the field of solid-state hydrogen absorption. The article delves into the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydrogen absorption, the various materials used, and the recent advancements in nanostructured materials and alloying elements. The challenges of slow kinetics, poor reversibility, and high operating temperatures are also discussed. The article concludes with a perspective on the future of solid-state hydrogen absorption in the context of the global energy landscape.


Introduction

Hydrogen, the lightest and most abundant element in the universe, has long been recognized as a potential alternative to fossil fuels due to its high energy content and environmentally friendly combustion products. However, the storage and transport of hydrogen pose significant challenges due to its low density and high reactivity. Solid-state hydrogen storage, in which hydrogen is absorbed into a solid material, offers a promising solution to these challenges. This review article provides an in-depth examination of the current state of solid-state hydrogen absorption, including the underlying principles, recent advancements, and ongoing challenges.


Principles of Solid-State Hydrogen Absorption

The process of solid-state hydrogen absorption involves the uptake of hydrogen atoms by a solid material, forming a hydride. This process can be represented by the following general reaction:


M + xH2 ↔ MHx


where M represents the metal or alloy, H2 is the hydrogen gas, and MHx is the resulting metal hydride. The forward reaction represents absorption (or charging), while the reverse reaction represents desorption (or discharging).


The thermodynamics of this reaction can be described by the van 't Hoff equation:


ln(P) = -ΔH/R(1/T) + ΔS/R


where P is the equilibrium pressure of the hydrogen gas, ΔH is the enthalpy change of the reaction, ΔS is the entropy change, R is the gas constant, and T is the temperature. This equation shows that the equilibrium pressure is inversely related to the temperature and directly related to the enthalpy change.


The kinetics of the absorption process can be described by the Arrhenius equation:


k = A exp(-Ea/RT)


where k is the rate constant, A is the pre-exponential factor, Ea is the activation energy, R is the gas constant, and T is the temperature. This equation shows that the rate of absorption is exponentially related to the temperature and inversely related to the activation energy.


Materials for Solid-State Hydrogen Absorption

Various materials have been investigated for solid-state hydrogen absorption, including interstitial metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides, and more recently, carbon-based materials such as graphene and graphene oxide.


Interstitial metal hydrides, such as palladium (Pd) and titanium (Ti), absorb hydrogen into the interstitial sites of their crystal lattices. The absorption capacity of these materials is typically limited to less than 2 wt% due to the limited number of interstitial sites. The absorption process can be represented by the following reaction:


Pd + 0.5H2 ↔ PdH


where PdH is the resulting palladium hydride.


Complex hydrides, such as lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH4) and sodium borohydride (NaBH4), can store hydrogen in the form of complex anions. These materials can achieve high hydrogen storage capacities (up to 20 wt%), but they often require high temperatures for hydrogen release. The absorption process can be represented by the following reaction:


LiAlH4 + 3H2 ↔ LiAl + 4H2


where LiAl is the resulting lithium aluminum alloy.


Chemical hydrides, such as ammonia borane (NH3BH3) and hydrazine (N2H4), store hydrogen in the form of covalent bonds. These materials can also achieve high hydrogen storage capacities, but they typically require a catalyst for hydrogen release. The absorption process can be represented by the following reaction:


NH3BH3 + H2 ↔ NH4BH4


where NH4BH4 is the resulting ammonium borohydride.


Carbon-based materials, such as graphene and graphene oxide, have recently attracted attention due to their unique properties, including a high surface area, tunable electronic structure, and excellent mechanical strength. These materials can adsorb hydrogen on their surface through physisorption or chemisorption, depending on the interaction strength between the hydrogen molecules and the carbon atoms. The absorption capacity of these materials is typically less than 1 wt% at room temperature, but it can be significantly enhanced by doping with other elements or by increasing the pressure. The absorption process can be represented by the following reaction:


C + H2 ↔ CH2


where CH2 is the resulting hydrogenated carbon.


Recent Advancements in Solid-State Hydrogen Absorption

Recent research in solid-state hydrogen absorption has focused on improving the absorption capacity, kinetics, and reversibility of the materials.


One promising approach is the use of nanostructured materials, which can provide a large surface area for hydrogen absorption and facilitate the diffusion of hydrogen atoms. For example, nanostructured palladium has been shown to exhibit a higher absorption capacity and faster kinetics than bulk palladium. Specifically, nanostructured palladium can absorb up to 0.9 wt% hydrogen at room temperature, compared to only 0.6 wt% for bulk palladium. Moreover, the absorption time for nanostructured palladium is less than 1 minute, compared to several hours for bulk palladium.


Another approach is the use of alloying elements, which can modify the electronic structure of the material and enhance its hydrogen absorption properties. For example, the addition of nickel (Ni) to magnesium (Mg) has been shown to significantly improve its absorption capacity and reversibility. Specifically, Mg2Ni can absorb up to 3.6 wt% hydrogen at 300°C, compared to only 1.2 wt% for pure Mg. Moreover, Mg2Ni can release 90% of the absorbed hydrogen within 30 minutes, compared to several hours for pure Mg.


In the case of carbon-based materials, several strategies have been proposed to enhance their absorption capacity and kinetics. For example, doping graphene with boron (B) or nitrogen (N) has been shown to increase its absorption capacity to up to 1.5 wt% at room temperature. Moreover, the use of graphene oxide, which contains oxygen-containing functional groups, can facilitate the chemisorption of hydrogen and thus improve the kinetics. Specifically, graphene oxide can absorb hydrogen within a few seconds, compared to several minutes for pure graphene.


In addition to these experimental advancements, theoretical studies have also provided valuable insights into the absorption process. For example, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have shown that the absorption capacity of a material is related to its electronic density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level. Specifically, a high DOS at the Fermi level can facilitate the formation of metal-hydrogen bonds and thus enhance the absorption capacity. This finding provides a theoretical basis for the design of new materials with high absorption capacities.


Challenges in Solid-State Hydrogen Absorption

Despite these advancements, several challenges remain in the field of solid-state hydrogen absorption.


One major challenge is the slow kinetics of the absorption and desorption processes, which can limit the practical use of the materials. This is often due to the


high activation energy for hydrogen diffusion and the formation/decomposition of the hydride phase. For example, the activation energy for hydrogen diffusion in palladium is about 0.3 eV, which corresponds to a diffusion coefficient of less than 10^-9 cm^2/s at room temperature. Various strategies have been proposed to overcome this challenge, including the use of catalysts, nanostructuring, and mechanical milling.


Another challenge is the reversibility of the absorption process. Many materials, especially complex and chemical hydrides, suffer from poor reversibility due to the decomposition of the hydride phase into stable by-products. This can lead to a decrease in the absorption capacity over repeated cycles. For example, the absorption capacity of LiAlH4 decreases by about 50% after 10 cycles. Research efforts are currently focused on finding ways to stabilize the hydride phase or regenerate the material after decomposition.


A further challenge is the high operating temperatures required for many materials. While high temperatures can facilitate the absorption process, they can also lead to the release of hydrogen, making it difficult to maintain a stable storage capacity. For example, the absorption capacity of Mg2Ni decreases by about 20% when the temperature is increased from 300°C to 400°C. This challenge can be addressed by optimizing the thermodynamics of the absorption process, for example, by adjusting the composition of the material or using a pressure-temperature swing.


In the case of carbon-based materials, a major challenge is the relatively low absorption capacity at room temperature. This is due to the weak interaction between the hydrogen molecules and the carbon atoms, which can be overcome by increasing the pressure or doping with other elements. However, these strategies can also lead to a decrease in the reversibility or an increase in the cost, which can limit the practical use of the materials. Moreover, the kinetics of these materials can be affected by the presence of defects or impurities, which can hinder the diffusion of hydrogen atoms.


Conclusion

Solid-state hydrogen absorption offers a promising solution to the challenges of hydrogen storage and transport. While significant progress has been made in the development of materials with high absorption capacities and fast kinetics, several challenges remain, including slow kinetics, poor reversibility, and high operating temperatures. Future research in this field should focus on addressing these challenges and further improving the performance of solid-state hydrogen absorption materials.


In the broader context of the global energy landscape, the development of efficient and reliable hydrogen storage technologies is crucial for the transition to a hydrogen-based energy system. Solid-state hydrogen absorption, with its potential for high storage densities and safe operation, represents a key piece of this puzzle. As research in this field continues to advance, it is hoped that the promise of hydrogen as a clean, abundant, and versatile energy carrier can be fully realized.


In conclusion, the field of solid-state hydrogen absorption is a dynamic and rapidly evolving area of research. The progress made so far has been significant, but many challenges remain. The future of this field will depend on the continued development of new materials and technologies, as well as a deeper understanding of the fundamental principles of hydrogen absorption. With continued research and innovation, solid-state hydrogen absorption has the potential to play a crucial role in the global transition to a sustainable energy future.

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